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is president obama. sacrificing his own freedom for the freedom of others. he transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a embodied the promise that human beings and countries cachange forhe better. the commitment to transfer power and reconcile with those who jailed him is an example that all humanity should aspire to. he joined the african national congress and worked to oppose apartheid. inwould be sentenced to life prison and remained behind bars for 27ears for being released. want a free man, he was able to negotiate an end to apartheid rule and become the first elected black president of south africa and a global icon for reconciliation. nelson mandela is the subject of the latest film that hit theaters this weekend. i am joined with more. >> harvey weinstein has put out a statement on its passing. one of the privileges of making movies is immortalizing those that have had a profound impact on humanity. i was fortunate to have been immersed in his story and legacy. some of the material has been made available to high school students. the goal by
and truly was known as the father of democracy in modern south africa. again, president obama is set to make remarks from the white house at 5:20. we will bring it to you as soon as it happens. our coverage continues right after this. >>> continuing to follow breaking news. the death of nelson mandela. here again, a live picture of the white house briefing room where president obama is set to make a statement. we'll bring it to you as soon as the president speaks. >>> earlier this afternoon, the announcement came from jacob zuma. he announced the crusaders death at a somber press conference. fellow south africans, nelson mandela brought us together and together we will bid him farewell. he was suffering from lung problems since he contracted tuberculosis on robin island. recent months, he's been in and out of the hospital. his family wished he had been home and, in fact, that is where he spent his last dais. >> again, we are awaiting comments from the white house and president obama. we will bring you the president's comments, his statement as soon as he makes them. >>> meanwhile, big change
that president obama was in africa when there was a concern that maybe nelson mandela's health was failing him then and perhaps the president might visit. that didn't happen at the time, and now we get word that at age 95, nelson mandela has passed on. i expect to hear a significant amount of reaction from the united states to this news. >> we have gotten news that president obama will be making a statement at about 20 minutes past the hour. in that report you spoke about mandela, of nelson and the lack of rancor he had toward past enemies. that has not meant peaceful times though? >> no. but you can imagine what it would be like had nelson mandela not reached out that way after he left prison in 1990. it has been documented in films. a new film out documenting nelson mandela and the decisions he made, the action he he took and the message he delivered at that time. i will take myself back to my college days and a class i took happened to have a particular focus on south africa when i was in college. we had a visitor in class, and it was someone who had served on robin island with nelson mand
's been fighting illness for a year or longer. he became south africa's first black president. president obama spoke to the nation a short time ago. >> we have lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings we will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us, he belongs to the ages. >> what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek. >> good evening from washington. in its own way is in a state of mourning tonight. nelson mandela was historic figure, inspiration and role model for africans, south africans, but americans as well in our own troubles racial history and struggle to overcome that mirrored to americans in the life and the struggle and the suffering and then the triumph and the leadership of nelson mandela whose passing at 95 was noted by his successor, south african president, jacob zuma. >> yet, what made nelson mandela great was precisely what made him human. we saw in him what we seek in ourselves. and in him, we saw so much of ourselves. >> reporter: one of those who says he was espec
that evolution. for him to finally meet an eafl president and have that moment when president obama was in africa in june. nelson mandela was too ill to receive him as a visitor. the inspiration, the sight of the obama girls in that prison cell in robin island with their father, the lesson, the moral authority he has been. the nobel prize he one. that was one of the most important moments. he signed the law when he became president that made discrimination against the white minority illegal in south africa. that is the moral leadership for which he won, co-won the prize with his former presser. that is the lesson for the withhold world. >> you are so right. he is the man. a string of american presidents they had in common. back to charlene. i know you have friends and family long associations there. i'm hoping that you can report to us that he was at peace at the end. >> yes, i think that he's been at peace for some time. he's been on a breathing tube and members of the family have said for the longest time that he seemed alert. although in the last few days, that has changed just a bit because t
that president obama met mandela. he didn't, this last time he went to south africa, because he was so ill and he wanted to respect the feengs of the family and he didn't go to see him. but clearl you c tell how could it be any other way that obama was so incredibly and heavily influenced and inspired by the struggle of nelson mandela. >> fareed, your thoughts after hearing the president of the united states. >> one of the things, wolf, that president obama reminded us was that this was one of the great moral causes and political causes of the 1980s and '90s. you remember it well and we have forgotten now, but it was one of the great rallying causes on college campuses around the western world. it was even true in asia. it was a cause that really was global in a way that very few were, because it was such a sore, a cancer, on global society, the idea that you had this white minority regime treating african blacks almost like slaves and this extraordinary system of institutionalized serfdom that was apartheid. obama reminds us that he, like many, many people, spent some time protesting against it,
for the bush white house. the election of barack obama, the kind of change towards a multiracial society that he saw in south africa as well. it was not just south africa that nelson mandela was revolutionary. it was his moral stature around the world and the way that he used it that made a difference. was tremendous respect from leaders around the world for nelson mandela. next year. are coming ines from presidents of this country. george w. bush, "we join the people of south africa and around the world and celebrity the life of nelson mandela. he was one of the great forces for freedom and equality of our time. he left the world with dignity and grace and our world is better off because of his example," that from president george w. bush a short time ago. jonathan karl, certainly president obama made aware of the news, the loss this afternoon. have we heard anything yet from the president? >> the white house is well aware of this, something we have been tracking a long time. no official statement yet. was a towering influence on president obama, inspiration. if you look now at the scre
and unbending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, he transformed south africa and moved all of us. >> pelley: president obama used the word modiba an honorary tightle that translates at father. major garrett at the white house tells us this evening mr. obama plans to attend the state funeral in south africa. that is likely to be in about ten days. nelson mandela will be remembered as a man who emerged from a tiny village to become a defining figure of our time. he was born on july 18th, 1918 in a village called mvezo. his mother named him holy sashava meaning troublemaker, but later a teacher renamed him nelson. he moved to johannesburg at 23, he became one of the nation's first black lawyers and joined the opposition african national congress in the early 1940s, devoting himself then to peacefully ending apartheid. then in 1960, 69 peaceful black demonstrators were killed by white south african police in the infamous sharpeville massacre. mandela came to believe that the only recourse then was violence. >> there are many people who feel that it is useless and futile for
of times in person, the obama family connecting with mandela's family in south africa. again you're looking right now outside of nelson mandela's home in johannesburg where people have gathered to remember, to reflect upon the life of the man they call madeva. he is the father of modern south africa, dead at 95. >> interestingly right now a lot of south africans are asleep because it is past midnight in south africa. so they're going to wake up to this news. those who have heard, many of them, probably heard on social media. we saw some reports on twitter and facebook earlier and i want to bring in russ ptacek now who has been sort of monitoring some of the comments that some people have left. what are you finding? >> a man known for so many sayings that touched so many and at the moment this news was breaking around the world and our newsroom was scurrying the nelson mandela foundation sent out one of his quotes. i don't know if you're able to pull up my ipad here. came from the nelson mandela ch foundation and you can see it's in several different languages. i'm going to pull u
back in june throughout africa and south africa that president barack obama was on. you could see him halting and pausing as he talked about the legacy. i think it's important to note that he spoke a lot about what you've been discussing and highlighting what is important, nelson mandela's push for reconciliation for those that imprisoned him. president barack obama says one thing he talks about ask how man dell laugh was stubborn about pushing forward not just dealing through the 27 years of imprison ment. after he got out, to continue to fight for the cause of freedom. he continued to push forward. that's a legacy for many people. >> it is. one of his quotes to that end. he said, do not judge me by my successes. judge me by how many times i fell down and got back up again. >> you heard the president talk about nelson mandela saying also that he wasn't a saint. he considered himself rather a sinner trying to become a saint, trying to continue to push forward the cause of justice and freedom. trying to stress. that was one of the reasons he was so beloved around the world is that he
of a truly united south africa. a peaceful and prosperous africa. and a better world. we will always love madiba. may his soul rest in peace. god bless africa. >> that was south africa'spresi. this evening at the white house, president obama expressed his condolences to nelson mandela's family and praised the transformative leader. >> at his trial in 1964, nelsonm the dock saying, i have fought against white domination, and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i hope to live for, and to achieve. but if need's be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. to achieve more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending welfare sacrif
of mr. mandela's health. remind the viewers of what president obama did when he went to south africa several months ago? >> well, again, i wasn't on that trip, but there was oncern, some talk even then. nelson mandela was in failing health at that time. that perhaps his visit to south africa could coincide with nelson mandela, his illness. he didn't go visit directly with nelson mandela at the time. their two lives, given their places in history, have intersected somewhat. we are waiting to hear what president obama says about nelson man tele. would not be surprised to have him appear on camera to discuss his legacy not only in south africa, but in the united states. there is a new movie out now about nelson mandela and his journey from an activist at the african national congress, to his imprisonment, his release and his rise to lead south africa, the incredible rise to lead south africa. no word exactly on what the president can say or when real hear something from president obama. i would think it would be in the not too distance future. not long ago the president himself was in a
and the impact that mandela had on the young barack obama when he was a student. he was roently in south africa and unable to see former president mandela because he was so ill, but i thought what i expected him to say. he was a young man in his formative years and very much affected by nelson mandela and i was pleased to hear the tribute he paid and i'm hoping that the world will feel in much the same way even it they didn't have the experience that president obama of and would not be able to articulate it. there lessons that we mead to continue to learn from nelson mandela and maybe that passing will bring the lessons that so many of your guests have said today. >> guided by hopes and not fear is how the president describes nelson mandela and said he drew tremendous inspiration from mandela. reaction to his death is coming in from world leaders. david cameron and prime minister ofbritain, a great light has gone out. jimmy carter said passion and freedom and justice created new hope for generations of oppressed people worldwide. former president george h.w. bush said he was a man of tremendous
. we shall miss you. we know your spirit and example will be there to guide us to a better south africa. coming up, the obama care story isn't going anywhere. there's other news today. stay with us. farmer: hello, i'm an idaho potato farmer. and our giant idaho potato truck is still missing. so my dog and i we're going to go find it. it's out there somewhere spreading the good word about idaho potatoes and raising money for meals on wheels. but we'd really like our truck back, so if you see it, let us know, would you? thanks. what? [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 70% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. south korea sout >>> so the news here in washington toda
a number of visitors, including first lady michelle obama. it also mandela became a living symbol of freedom -- nelson mandela became a living symbol of freedom and the strength of south africa and freedom beyond. has already begun at the south african embassy. hassle fella has more. >> at the south african embassy, a real-life reminder of this man's life and legacy. in front of the embassy, the nine foot statue made of bronze, designed by a south african sculptor, modeled after images of mandela back in 1990. the closed fist, almost signaling victory. he was jailed 27 years three decades ago, at the very spot where dozens of protesters, americans included, who were arrested because they were protecting against apartheid in south africa. we talked with this 12-year-old girl who came with her father to pay tribune to this man. we asked why anybody this young should care about his legacy. she said, because he fought for many people. >> i want to pray for his family, his him, and all the people suffering for his loss. and i would like to say thank you for him and everything he did fo
the georgetown. and president obama came to see him. so it is a lifetime of inspiration, there are obvious parallels. of course, his father from the continent of africa, them son mandela, the president being the first african-american president, it's almost too obvious to point out the deep rest nantz there. between these two men. and obviously someone that president obama looked up to a great deal. >> mike, appreciate that, thank you. >> joining us now he is a professor from ucla.'s goo, one of the real joys of this moment, is going to be had a personal association. with nelson mandela if you want to take a look with the former south african president. >> well, i have known about nelson mandela since i started studying and he had always been promptly inspirational. i met him for the first time after he had been released from prison. for all of that time in the 70's and 80's he was in prison. i was struck particularly by 1 point that president obama just made. he did indeed take action with the demonstration about apartheid. i think it was in 1981. many people have had a different time fro
of south africa said the mr. mandela's death is greatest sorrow. this is president speaking of mandela's family. so much our people would be free. very emotional words from the president of south africa. melissa: here is president obama. let's listen in. >> nelson mandela closed statement from the dock saying, i have fought against white domination. and i have fought against black domination. i have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i hope to live for and to achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal and he made it real. he achieved more than could be expected of any man. today he has gone home and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous an profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and unbending will, to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south
and the african -- throughout south africa and the african continent has only begun. president obama has now said that he has gotten old and leaving the seat. the truth is he has gotten married and he feels young and he is tired of his response test of his public responsibilities and he wants to go into a broader life. [applause] those of us who share his vision and lift him up in honor today owe it to him to build a permanent partnership between , for the and africans education of our children, for the solution of our problems, for the resolution of our differences, for the elevation of what is best about us all. that is what we owe to nelson and her to amy beal family, and to all of those who have sacrificed. for those 10,000 long days and the shiny example sent the clear understanding that a man who has given up so much of his life can give us that even more important than the sacrificed yesterday is what you are doing with today and what you will do with tomorrow. for that is the thing that always humbles me when i am with nelson mandela, the sense of serenity and peace and engagement in the
of freedom. president obama met mandela once in 2005, when obama was a senator. after one term as president mandela stepped down. he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a variety of causes. when south africa hosted soccer's world cup tournament in july 2010 he made his last major public appearance at the final game. the crowd honoured him with a thunderous ovation. his third wife, grassa michelle, the former first lady of mozambique was at his side during his battles with prostate cancer and lung infections that hospitalized him in the end. >> never, and never again, that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another, and suffer the indignity of being the scum of the world. the sun shall never set on so glorious a human achievement. god bless africa. thank you. nelson mandela dead at 95. >> let's get to the white house, mike viqueira is the white house correspondent and he has reaction from president obama to the death of nelson mandela. mike? >> about 50 minutes ago president obama came into the james brady briefing room. no secret
who helped free south africa from apartheid and inspired citizens of all nations. president obama spoke just moments ago. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. for now let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. may god bless his memory and keep him in peace. >> mandela spent nearly a third of his life as a prisoner of apartheid, but he never stopped believing in freedom for himself and his country. outside his home just moments ago, the people of south africa were singing. ♪ >> we'll be going live to south africa in just a moment, but first i want to bring in nbc news contributor charlene hunter galt. she spent years covering both nelson mandela and the anti-apartheid movement in south africa. thank you for being on tonight. >> thank yo
that occurred in sharkville in south africa in 1960. he was jailed after a trial. and then emerged triumphant and somebody that the entire world could look up to. this is -- you can bet that president obama's going to be heard on this before too long. and we've lost somebody that deserves emulation everywhere. >> i don't know, i just want to bring people a little bit of background information here about mandela's condition over the last couple of months. he had been three months in the hospital with the recurrent lun september, originally. but those lung problems attributed to the tuberculosis he contracted during 27 years in prison before he led his country to democracy, subject of many biopics lately. what is your view on his history in south africa and overseas? >> i think he has more stature than anyone around the world with the possible exception of the pope. a lot of continue versy around the current president as well as becky who proceeded him in that job who was nelson mandela's successor. i think this is somebody whose reputation was titanic and the entire world will be mourning. >>
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21